Red RHD 240z at auction

Robotsan

Well-Known Forum User
Not a whole lot of information on this car, but the description, the side the steering wheel is on and the surprisingly low auction guide price (18 - 22k) piqued my interest: https://www.classiccarsforsale.co.uk/x/x/aetv43477291

Anyone know the car? Its got a few down sides - aftermarket seats, and those LED headlights, and there seem to be a few rust bubbles under the rear window and hatch slam panel (see the YouTube walk round) which is a bit worrying considering its allegedly had a recent full respray, right?

But if we assume it is not full of filler and wasn't a cheap respray to sell the car, this would surely reach something like 28 - 35k right? Is it a genuine UK car btw? Can you guys tell?
 

Rob Gaskin

Treasurer
Staff member
Site Administrator
Very interesting. I would think this would belong at some time to a member on here.

Yes it will be hiding some body issues.

Solex carbs are rare.

It needs a close and thorough inspection but the estimate is low.
 

Makesy

Club Member
Not foolproof by any means but a quick mot check throws up some rust issues from 2013 when it last failed (and wasn't tested since) back when an MOT was still required.

I'd be looking for evidence that the rust was corrected as one could theoretically self certify and claim this as a roadworthy vehicle.

First registered in May 1973 so I guess it's an original RHD though someone better informed than me may be able to clarify



Screenshot_2021-11-17-18-46-56-328_com.android.chrome.png Screenshot_2021-11-17-18-46-52-997_com.android.chrome.png
 

Robotsan

Well-Known Forum User
Very interesting. I would think this would belong at some time to a member on here.

Yes it will be hiding some body issues.

Solex carbs are rare.

It needs a close and thorough inspection but the estimate is low.

Yeah I'm hoping someone might recognise it from here.

What's special about those carbs? Just rare?
 

Robotsan

Well-Known Forum User
Not foolproof by any means but a quick mot check throws up some rust issues from 2013 when it last failed (and wasn't tested since) back when an MOT was still required.

I'd be looking for evidence that the rust was corrected as one could theoretically self certify and claim this as a roadworthy vehicle.

First registered in May 1973 so I guess it's an original RHD though someone better informed than me may be able to clarify



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Never even crossed my mind that there might be MOT history for these cars as I knew they were exempt! Good thinking. And yeah definitely sounded serious. You'd definitely want some decent evidence and hopefully WIP photos of a good repair job.
 

Robotsan

Well-Known Forum User
I think there were some question marks with this car (admittedly, ones that could possibly have been answered if a buyer asked the seller) around the restoration, judging by the MOT data above, and the worrying looking bubbling on the rear hatch. So might have put a lot of bidders off.
 

richiep

Club Member
TBH, I'd think around 30k was about right. It looks good overall, but not perfect - so, allowing for some potential for tweaks and improvements, it seems reasonable.

All the cars listed these days for 40-45K for many months on end - when ones do sell, I seriously doubt they are going for near the original list price. For every genuinely nice one that could justifiably be worth that, there are several that are dreaming/chancing.
 

Kieronpollock

Club Member
TBH, I'd think around 30k was about right. It looks good overall, but not perfect - so, allowing for some potential for tweaks and improvements, it seems reasonable.

All the cars listed these days for 40-45K for many months on end - when ones do sell, I seriously doubt they are going for near the original list price. For every genuinely nice one that could justifiably be worth that, there are several that are dreaming/chancing.

interesting, the white one for sale on Car and classic was bought by the dealer on eBay for £32k and a week later he had it off sale at £45k and that was months ago. I’m knee deep into my resto using reliable, experienced (albeit nice) specialists so thankfully not paying through the nose, yet with parts costs I can’t see how a very good (but not concourse) restoration of a UK RHD car can be done for less than £45-50k.
 

richiep

Club Member
interesting, the white one for sale on Car and classic was bought by the dealer on eBay for £32k and a week later he had it off sale at £45k and that was months ago. I’m knee deep into my resto using reliable, experienced (albeit nice) specialists so thankfully not paying through the nose, yet with parts costs I can’t see how a very good (but not concourse) restoration of a UK RHD car can be done for less than £45-50k.

There’s a difference though between the expense associated with a properly executed, modern restoration and what a car - particularly one that may not have been a thorough resto in the past - can command as a sale item. It’s the same gap that exists in insurance valuations; any agreed insurance valuation of your car should reflect what’s been spent on it, NOT the “market value” - because the latter is going to be lower than what it might cost to replace like for like.

Restoring a car to a good standard can easily outstrip the potential resale value - especially if the latter isn’t a priority and one is doing it to keep. It’s very common in the classic world for restoration projects to cost more than an owner can realistically hope to get back, unless the car undergoes a sudden upsurge in popularity that send prices sky high at some point (e.g. old 911s, Skylines, etc.).

Restoring to sell requires effective and efficient practice and producing a finished car that can genuinely tick all the boxes to command a premium price that makes the effort economically worthwhile.
 
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