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Keeping the Z alive

Discussion in 'General discussion' started by STEVE BURNS, Jan 30, 2018.

  1. STEVE BURNS

    STEVE BURNS
    ZClub Administrator
    Staff Member Committee Member

    NEWS: 29th Jan 2018 Nissan still “working on” keeping the Z alive

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    The current Nissan Z is nearly a decade old and the automaker has given not even the slightest suggestion of a successor. However, the company’s most memorable model is perhaps not completely dead, according to a Nissan executive’s recent statements.
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    Nissan chief planning officer Philippe Klein told Automotive News in an interview published yesterday, “We want to keep [the Z] alive, and that’s what we’re working on.”

    Klein admitted that “The Z is a difficult market” and that it is “shrinking worldwide.” It’s true, increased safety regulations make engineering a lightweight and low-slung sports more difficult, what with added equipment for occupants and minimum height requirements for pedestrian injury mitigation. But in fact it is changing driving habits that might doom the sports car. As per Automotive News:

    He said the rise of SUVs and crossovers has shifted consumers’ mindset away from “speed, acceleration and cornering” as vehicle attributes.

    Still, Klein says that “We still believe there is a place for the Z.”
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    Before we get too excited, though, a close reading of Klein’s statements seems to indicate that they are working on how to justify the Z in the short term, as we wait for its successor in the long term. Again, Klein:

    “For the long term, there are other considerations. If we do a complete new vehicle, what should it be to keep the passion alive? And we’re working very seriously on this — how we can keep the Z alive and refreshing and what would be the next generation?”

    In a sense, it’s easier to talk about a future Z. Myriad powertrain options, from hybrid to pure electric may ensure the survival of Nissan’s trademark sports car. It’s the bridge that may prove more difficult, especially if a competitive offering must be built atop an existing platform.

    “The passion is there,” Klein told Automotive News. “The question is how can we refresh it and what will be the breakthrough for the long term?”
     

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    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 30, 2018
  2. Jay.

    Jay.
    Z Club Member

    Whilst I agree that as legislation tightens it becomes increasingly difficult to build a new Z, but there are a few manufacturers out there that have achieved enjoyable sports cars for relatively little cost.
     
  3. SeanDezart

    SeanDezart
    Z Club Member
    Official Trader

    Back to basicZ !

    A cheap 'n light coupé !
     
  4. TimW

    TimW 1978 UK RHD 260z

    Team up with Tesla and add lots of exterior chrome :thumbs:
     
  5. Woody928

    Woody928
    Z Club Member

    If Toyota can still make the GT86 at the price point they did then I'm sure Nissan can come up with a replacement to the Z, sooner of later it will become hybrid though I'm sure.
     
  6. SeanDezart

    SeanDezart
    Z Club Member
    Official Trader

  7. Woody928

    Woody928
    Z Club Member

    Its just the way the industry is going these days, high output NA engines are becoming a thing of the past. Turbo and hybrid systems combined seem to be the best bet performance wise, you only have to look at the LMP1 cars at Le Mans to see how unbelievable the performance is...
     
  8. SeanDezart

    SeanDezart
    Z Club Member
    Official Trader

    Turbos are hardly news though - remember the '80s ? And all that sprung from F1.

    Le Mans is the same principal - the rules say 'thus' so they build and race to 'thus'. If the ACO were to change them to n/a petrol only, the performance would still be impressive as teams/manufacturers redesigned to a new spec.
     
  9. Woody928

    Woody928
    Z Club Member

    Not suggesting it is, and I appreciate there are regulations in most of the high end sports there is however still some flexibility.

    Take a look at any of the major manufacturers around though and tell me that they don't feel that turbo hybrid engines are the future of performance for cars. Regardless of the level you look at either one of these technologies is incorporated.

    The days of the NA engine are sadly becoming more limited in my opinion and I can't imagine one being used in the next generation Z...
     

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