The Project Dixie thread! | Page 3 | The Z Club of Great Britain
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The Project Dixie thread!

Discussion in 'Rebuilds and restorations' started by richiep, Sep 17, 2019.

  1. Turn & Burn

    Turn & Burn
    Z Club Member

    Tidy work! good effort on the lead loading, not many restorations doing that I’ll bet. The lower doglegs are a right PIA to get right too. I agree with Rob about the overlap tho, they should sit flush but with a visible seam. The rocker panel is swaged down to allow the dog leg to sit flush on top, the swage is just about visible in the attached pic
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Jan 29, 2020
  2. Rob Gaskin

    Rob Gaskin Treasurer Staff Member Moderator

    Rich I understand about the filler comment and yes my old red car was like that. My two current cars aren't though. The car that has had the doglegs repaired (Samuri) is like your's but the blue car has almost a level joint. I don't think the blue car has been repaired.

    This is not a criticism, your work is A1 and always good to see and learn from.
     
  3. jonbills

    jonbills
    ZClub Administrator
    Staff Member Moderator

    I'll have to check, but I also thought my car's sill panel is shaped to go under the dog leg, leaving the finished join looking level. Richie's original doesn't look like that - naybe the panels changed over the years?
     
  4. richiep

    richiep
    Z Club Member

    I wouldn't be at all surprised in there being a degree of variation from vehicle to vehicle and between years in how neat that dogleg to sill seam looks. The original sills on Dixie, is seen in the photos have a negligible swage that isn't consistent all the way across the sill - to the point where getting a uniform flush fit would be impossible due to the thickness of the sheet metal anyway.

    Here's a photo from the front showing the lip with the seam sealer just about visible in the shadow. The dogleg actually looks much neater than the factory door frame piece it overlaps on top of the sill! The wrapped over lip on top of the dogleg is the original, as from the factory. Worth noting, the bottom lip below the dogleg will be trimmed down to the right size further down the line - it has a bit of excess on it compared to the lip on the outer sill.
    [​IMG]
     
  5. richiep

    richiep
    Z Club Member

    Of course, the other thing to note here is that the above only has minimal filler and paint on it. Just a coat of Novol bodywork primer, and 2-3 coats of 2K epoxy primer on top. Add a bit of further skimming for straightness, and coats of 2k high build primer, and then basecoat and clear, and seams like the dogleg and elsewhere will be significantly less noticeable. Looking at the above pic, I will likely make sure I focus some of the skimming of the sill on that top corner to make that overlap more uniform.
     
  6. richiep

    richiep
    Z Club Member

    Did more on the screen pillar to scuttle joint. Looking at photos of factory leading in that area, I tidied things up by melting some excess lead off, fibreglassing, glazing and sanding to give a more professional, finished look. Could stand a little more sanding but given how much of this area is actually visible on an assembled car (when windscreen rubber, drip rail, and front wing are in place), I think it’s pretty good!
    [​IMG]
     
    Pondo, Turn & Burn and atomman like this.
  7. richiep

    richiep
    Z Club Member

    Here’s one to give you nightmares. When people claim to have a “rust free California car”, even if it looks like it rolled out the factory or is some high five figure specialist restoration, just bear in mind that the S30 shell in riddled with unreachable seams, overlaps, and other features that no amount of baking, dipping, soda or other media blasting will ever get to - unless you actually open things right up. Case study: because I’m RHD converting Dixie, this evening I finally pulled the LHD bulkhead reinforcing plate off...
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    Think of all those spot welded seams that will never be separated normally. This is why drenching the cavities of a freshly restored and painted shell with something like Dinitrol ML and 3125 is essential. Something to soak in and get to at least some of those places. As for the above, it’s not an issue as I’m cutting that piece out to replace with the correctly pressed RHD equivalent, but makes a nice example to look at!

    At least, with my little stool and the rad support behind me, I could chill out..
    [​IMG]
     
  8. Rushingphil

    Rushingphil
    Z Club Member

    Loving your resto skills :bow: and many thanks for the time and effort you're putting into updating the thread, I know how long it takes! It's going to be so useful for me in the future :)

    Quick question please - you've obviously done a lot of spot weld drilling - what have you found to be the most useful / best quality drill bits so far please? Most of the ones I've tried previously have been rubbish :(
     
  9. richiep

    richiep
    Z Club Member

    I’d like to know the answer to that too! Spot weld cutters seem to be disposable items that last minutes in use! I have a spot weld drill bit that is much better (will check the brand) but you have to be careful as it is easy to be overzealous and go right through.
     
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  10. atomman

    atomman
    Z Club Member

    I use the solid carbide spot weld drills , cost a bit but will save you in the long run if you have loads to drill out, I've found the cobalt type are ok but the others with the yellow coating are all pretty pants.
     
    Rushingphil likes this.
  11. Rushingphil

    Rushingphil
    Z Club Member

    Thanks - I'm guessing 6mm?
     
  12. Wally

    Wally
    Z Club Member

    I've used this type to good effect.
    [​IMG]
     
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  13. atomman

    atomman
    Z Club Member

    8 mm - 3 flute

    The type above are pretty good to as the teeth are hardened
     
    Rushingphil likes this.
  14. Rushingphil

    Rushingphil
    Z Club Member

    Many thanks to both of you. Sorry to hijack your thread Richie!
     
  15. richiep

    richiep
    Z Club Member

    These are the type I've been destroying. The ones I've got must be made from chocolate!
     
  16. Rushingphil

    Rushingphil
    Z Club Member

  17. Wally

    Wally
    Z Club Member

  18. Rushingphil

    Rushingphil
    Z Club Member

    Very true - will be interesting to see how long they actually last !
     
  19. Wally

    Wally
    Z Club Member

    I hope they work out well for you.
     
    Rushingphil likes this.
  20. richiep

    richiep
    Z Club Member

    This is the route I went after what you said Gary. Bought a solid carbide one. More expensive but much more effective.

    Made a little progress over the last week or two - although I’ve now run out of mig gas and am away this weekend so stalled until Monday when I can pick up a new bottle. Started the first element of the RHD swap...

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    These were helpful new toys - magnetic copper welding backers by Eastwood. Super expensive from Frost’s, but they sent me two by accident!
    [​IMG]
     

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