Moving from US to UK with my 240Z

Mr Tenno

Digital Officer
Staff member
Site Administrator
They just circulate air, it's not dehumidified so won't prevent flash rust from forming etc.
 

Mr Tenno

Digital Officer
Staff member
Site Administrator
I guess the follow up question there is, how well sealed is your garage?

Personally, I have one car in an outdoor carcoon and another one under a dust cover inside a reasonably well sealed garage with no dehumidifier. They both seem to be doing ok.
 

Rob Gaskin

Treasurer
Staff member
Site Administrator
I guess the follow up question there is, how well sealed is your garage?

Personally, I have one car in an outdoor carcoon and another one under a dust cover inside a reasonably well sealed garage with no dehumidifier. They both seem to be doing ok.
Is a sealed garage a good idea. Isn't it better to have ventilation?
 

toopy

Club Member
Is a sealed garage a good idea. Isn't it better to have ventilation?
I think properly sealed is ok as long as there is absolutely no chance of any damp, and the temp never drops below 10 degrees C, so heated basically. Draughty as in the usual type garage door with small gaps here and there, especially the bottom, and your better off having vents elsewhere to allow air movement, which is an absolute must if the temp inside can hit zero or close to it!
 

candy red

Club Member
I’ve got a sealed garage,brick outer skin 30 mm celotex insulation in cavity block inner skin slate roof with a breathable membrane and an insulated garage door concrete floor with a damp proof membrane built by myself.I don’t have any problems with things going rusty I’ve got sheets of bare metal been in there for at least 4years and no signs of rust on them 😎🤓
 

uk66fastback

Club Member
Keep the damp out at all costs. You don’t need a carcoon if you do that imo. Just a thin cover to keep the dust off …
 

Robotsan

Club Member
Is a sealed garage a good idea. Isn't it better to have ventilation?

That's what I asked earlier in the thread as I'd heard the same.

I think properly sealed is ok as long as there is absolutely no chance of any damp, and the temp never drops below 10 degrees C, so heated basically. Draughty as in the usual type garage door with small gaps here and there, especially the bottom, and your better off having vents elsewhere to allow air movement, which is an absolute must if the temp inside can hit zero or close to it!

I have a single garage built in the 80s I think. Think it's a single course of bricks with a layer of insulation which is then covered with a layer of plasterboard and the ceiling is the same but with wood. Then I've got a draughty garage door and a thin wood door at the other end which is pretty well sealed.

So would I be best off installing a fan at each end to get the air flowing through it?
 

Kieronpollock

Club Member
Sealing it would probably be the easiest, since it's a single garage with just the garage door (No other doors or windows). I was planning to paint the inside too (Brick and cinderblock). I wonder if epoxy floors, painted walls, and a dehumidifier would be enough...

Or maybe the no doors or windows is the issue and I do need something to help with airflow. I think it will take a bit of trial and error.
I painted my walls, installed a radiator (as my boiler is in the garage), expoxy resined the floor, added a plaster board ceiling and drill vent holes through a number of the bricks.
My garage doesn’t fall much below 11 degrees now. Ive there was a large change in temp forecast I’d turn on the dehumidifier. I’ve therefore no need for a carcoon…. Thank god as I’ve spent all my dosh on the above 😬
 

Robotsan

Club Member
I painted my walls, installed a radiator (as my boiler is in the garage), expoxy resined the floor, added a plaster board ceiling and drill vent holes through a number of the bricks.
My garage doesn’t fall much below 11 degrees now. Ive there was a large change in temp forecast I’d turn on the dehumidifier. I’ve therefore no need for a carcoon…. Thank god as I’ve spent all my dosh on the above 😬

I was thinking about the floors, as I've got a lumpy concrete floor at the moment and I'm assuming that's not good for temperatures. Is putting epoxy resin down like using self levelling compound? I imagine my garage only stays a few degrees above the outside temp.
 

Kieronpollock

Club Member
I was thinking about the floors, as I've got a lumpy concrete floor at the moment and I'm assuming that's not good for temperatures. Is putting epoxy resin down like using self levelling compound? I imagine my garage only stays a few degrees above the outside temp.
Check out Resincoat. My garage only stayed a few degrees above outside temp but insulating the roof improved it a bit. The game changer was installing a radiator
 

Dale

Club Member
That's what I asked earlier in the thread as I'd heard the same.



I have a single garage built in the 80s I think. Think it's a single course of bricks with a layer of insulation which is then covered with a layer of plasterboard and the ceiling is the same but with wood. Then I've got a draughty garage door and a thin wood door at the other end which is pretty well sealed.

So would I be best off installing a fan at each end to get the air flowing through it?

That sounds pretty similar to my garage.

I think perhaps quick changes in temperature can cause some damp. The best thing I did was insulate the metal garage doors which helped stabilise the temperature inside. It keeps the temperature from dropping too low and before I did it I think that as the outside air warmed up or when the sun hit the garage door it warmed up the air too quickly and any damp in the air condensed on the very cold surfaces.

Now it stays a fairly even temperature. It’s cold in the winter but not freezing and nice and cool in the summer. I haven’t noticed any damp since.
 

Dale

Club Member
I was thinking about the floors, as I've got a lumpy concrete floor at the moment and I'm assuming that's not good for temperatures. Is putting epoxy resin down like using self levelling compound? I imagine my garage only stays a few degrees above the outside temp.

Mine is fully carpeted which I guess also helps. 😬
 

Robotsan

Club Member
Check out Resincoat. My garage only stayed a few degrees above outside temp but insulating the roof improved it a bit. The game changer was installing a radiator

Thanks, will do. I guess the roof is already insulated - there's a layer of loftwool type stuff about 3 inches thick and then wood panelling over that.

Radiator would be a stretch as the garage isn't connected to the house!
 

Robotsan

Club Member
That sounds pretty similar to my garage.

I think perhaps quick changes in temperature can cause some damp. The best thing I did was insulate the metal garage doors which helped stabilise the temperature inside. It keeps the temperature from dropping too low and before I did it I think that as the outside air warmed up or when the sun hit the garage door it warmed up the air too quickly and any damp in the air condensed on the very cold surfaces.

Now it stays a fairly even temperature. It’s cold in the winter but not freezing and nice and cool in the summer. I haven’t noticed any damp since.

I was considering that too. What did you use to insulate the door?

I've just ordered a Bluetooth hydrostat/thermostat off Amazon so I can see what's happening to the temp and humidity in there all year round 🤓
 

uk66fastback

Club Member
After my trouble with garage floors - I epoxy-resined my original concrete one which I’d tried to level with levelling compound, but that gave me an awful finish, and I hated thevred, so I took that all up. Then I painted it with grey epoxy-resin. I hated that too. So I did it in carpet tiles finally - which I should have done originally …

IMG_2049.jpeg
 

Dale

Club Member
I was considering that too. What did you use to insulate the door?

I use polystyrene boards to pack out the door sections then covered the whole back of the door with corrugated plastic sheeting.



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