No username? Register here.
Go Back   ZClub.net > General > Rebuilds and restorations
MJP AUTO

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #136  
Old 15-04-2017, 08:02 AM
Paul_S's Avatar
Paul_S Paul_S is offline
Z Club member
Fourth gear
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Nr Ashford, Kent
Posts: 672
Member 408
Wow - those HT leads really make the engine bay a lot tidier! Not OEM I know, but a real improvement IMHO.

Other than to save costs, does anyone know of a reason why Datsun chose to route the HT leads over the top of the head?
__________________

Reply With Quote
  #137  
Old 15-04-2017, 09:46 AM
Rob Gaskin's Avatar
Rob Gaskin Rob Gaskin is offline
Membership Secretary
Sixth gear
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Hinckley
Posts: 10,161
Member 214
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul_S View Post
Wow - those HT leads really make the engine bay a lot tidier! .................
I agree. How tight is it behind the fan?
__________________
240Z '71 Built and Modified by DJR
Reply With Quote
  #138  
Old 15-04-2017, 09:50 AM
franky franky is online now
Z Club member
Fifth gear
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Sunny southwest
Posts: 2,958
Member 770
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul_S View Post
Wow - those HT leads really make the engine bay a lot tidier! Not OEM I know, but a real improvement IMHO.

Other than to save costs, does anyone know of a reason why Datsun chose to route the HT leads over the top of the head?
I don't know how it'll save costs? think about the brackets etc that were used on the valve cover? The clips, extra casting efforts? I'm sure a shorter length would offer more performance from the wires(back in the day!). Keeps them nicely separated also, which might have been a key point with noisy leads. A few years back when we use to do the tv coverage for goodwood we could get interference off some of the more original cars and their ignition systems.

What are you going to do with the clips/brackets/holes on the valve cover?
Reply With Quote
  #139  
Old 15-04-2017, 09:52 AM
Paul_S's Avatar
Paul_S Paul_S is offline
Z Club member
Fourth gear
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Nr Ashford, Kent
Posts: 672
Member 408
Fair point - I was only thinking of less material required for the leads.
__________________

Reply With Quote
  #140  
Old 15-04-2017, 11:11 AM
Paul_S's Avatar
Paul_S Paul_S is offline
Z Club member
Fourth gear
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Nr Ashford, Kent
Posts: 672
Member 408
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rob Gaskin View Post
I agree. How tight is it behind the fan?
This is a photo from the Datsun Spirit web site:

__________________

Reply With Quote
  #141  
Old 15-04-2017, 11:44 AM
Woody928's Avatar
Woody928 Woody928 is offline
Z Club member
Third gear
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Location: Surrey
Posts: 375
Member 1093
Thanks chaps, I'm not sure why its not more popular other than the fact they charge a few quid for the privilege. I saw them on one of the Facebook groups and thought they looked fantastic so we had to get a set.

Quote:
Originally Posted by franky View Post
A few years back when we use to do the tv coverage for goodwood we could get interference off some of the more original cars and their ignition systems.

What are you going to do with the clips/brackets/holes on the valve cover?
What do you do for work out of curiosity, sounds like you into filming?

Nothing for now as that's not really been on the agenda albeit I acknowledge its not the most aesthetically pleasing. I suppose I'd have to pickup another valve cover. I've got more pressing jobs to do such as under sealing, brakes, suspension and transmission. Long term we're planning on dropping a modified L28 of some description in there so that will be the opportunity to tidy everything up as much as possible in the engine bay department. I've always been a function over form kinda guy in terms of my priorities.

Cheers for posting up the pic Paul that demonstrates it quite nicely, I can always grab some more photos when I get the car next week but its all neatly secured away from the fan so there's no worries there. If your not going for an all out OEM finish then it wins for me every day
__________________
1971 Datsun 240z - L26 - 918 Orange
Reply With Quote
  #142  
Old 15-04-2017, 08:14 PM
franky franky is online now
Z Club member
Fifth gear
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Sunny southwest
Posts: 2,958
Member 770
Quote:
Originally Posted by Woody928 View Post



What do you do for work out of curiosity, sounds like you into filming?

. If your not going for an all out OEM finish then it wins for me every day
I don't think total OEM is the way forward either!

I work for this company http://www.nepinc.com/welcome/nep_uk
Reply With Quote
  #143  
Old 15-04-2017, 08:25 PM
johnymd's Avatar
johnymd johnymd is offline
Z Club member
Sixth gear
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Benfleet, Essex
Posts: 5,212
Member 514
I much prefer the ht leads being routed this way. I've taken mine around the front of the valve cover.
__________________
Drives:

'73 240z 1JZ-GTE. Was pretty quick. 11.10@132.5mph
'72 240z RHD (4BOA) Being painted Orange. Bodyshop.
'72 240z LHD Black. Sold.
'73 240z LHD Green. Sold.
'73 240z LHD White. Sold - Future race car.
'73 240z LHD Blue. Sold.
'73 260z LHD Orange. Sold to a good home.
'70 240z LHD Yellow. On route and cant wait.
Skyline R33 GTS - Gone
Skyline R34 GTR - Gone
Toyota Surf 3.0TD

Go to: www.240z.me.uk to checkout the cars.
Reply With Quote
  #144  
Old 16-04-2017, 05:20 PM
Woody928's Avatar
Woody928 Woody928 is offline
Z Club member
Third gear
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Location: Surrey
Posts: 375
Member 1093
Quote:
Originally Posted by franky View Post
I don't think total OEM is the way forward either!

I work for this company http://www.nepinc.com/welcome/nep_uk
Glad to see there's several others who don't stand totally in the way of progress

Sounds kinda cool, you must get to cover some really interesting events I would imagine! I'm always amazed by the eclectic mix of professions amongst the owners on the forums.
__________________
1971 Datsun 240z - L26 - 918 Orange
Reply With Quote
  #145  
Old 05-07-2017, 10:53 PM
Woody928's Avatar
Woody928 Woody928 is offline
Z Club member
Third gear
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Location: Surrey
Posts: 375
Member 1093
Well as usual this is well over due and a lot has gone on in the last few months. The car made both the Donnington Historic and Leeds Castle. As always it was really good to finally put some names to faces.

As some of you will know during my trip to B.D. Engineering to have the car tuned after only the first run we discovered a head gasket leak so had to abort the session, leaving me with no choice but to drive in a particularly gentle manor to both shows until it could be sorted. Having thought over my options and spoken to several people the job was well beyond my mechanical knowledge so I decided to leave it to the Pro’s on this occasion. While figuring out where to take the car I remembered a contact that I’d met through Russ on here last year while attending a Pistonheads meet at Goodwood who’s recently setup his own workshop and helped Russ work on his car with great success.

A quick phone call later and the car was booked in to visit Iain who owns and runs ‘Passion Engineering’ based in West Sussex. Not quite knowing what to expect with a 47 year old car and engine of an unknown quality I explained the issue and left the car with Iain to do a complete check over and resolve the head gasket issue. To begin with Iain did a pressure test on the coolant system which revealed several leaks from various pipes across the engine which all had to be fixed before the pressure allowed the coolant to start dripping from the suspect area. Next job was to strip down the engine and find out what we were dealing with.

As with all of these jobs and with engines of this age various bits and pieces popped up, the head was warped and required re facing, for unknown reasons the valves on cylinder six had run hotter with one of the intake valves having recessed into the seat requiring replacement, all of the exhaust studs were pretty knackered. The list went on…. We had some delivery lead times which were longer than expected with parts arriving from the US however finally everything eventually turned up. A visit to the machine shop and everything back ready to reassembly, we took the opportunity to replace the stem oil seals, gaskets and re-lapped all valves. While looking at the fitment of the current exhaust manifold our heat issue was identified with the manifold only half covering the exhaust port on cylinder six strangling its airflow. Fortunately owing to Iain’s mechanical skills he’s completely sorted out the alignment of it and we’re back in business (hopefully a Z story replacement will make it on there one day). Following which several bodges were revealed from the cars past including the most bodged replacement bushing I’ve ever seen in the cylinder head for the exhaust cylinder 6 exhaust stud location. Fortunately Iain milled a replacement and welded it in to sort the issue (Pics below). With the engine fully rebuilt various tidy up jobs were done to clean up the engine bay making it safer including an oversight on my behalf. The battery was also further isolated to protect the car further along with some clean-up work as well.

Full Strip down
IMG_5803 by Mark Woodrow, on Flickr

IMG_5804 by Mark Woodrow, on Flickr

IMG_5805 by Mark Woodrow, on Flickr

IMG_5945 by Mark Woodrow, on Flickr

IMG_5944 by Mark Woodrow, on Flickr

Reassembly
IMG_6147 by Mark Woodrow, on Flickr

The aforementioned beautiful ex horror exhaust stud bush
IMG_2576 by Mark Woodrow, on Flickr

IMG_2575 by Mark Woodrow, on Flickr

Every item that was removed was stripped and examined before being reassembled and oiled or greased where appropriate, our throttle return issues was found to be the return springs holding insufficient tension owing to their age so have been replaced with some new Webber one which are performing fantastically now with no signs of a sticking throttle. We’re aware that the carbs are showing signs of age related wear however we’re leaving them as is for now with plans for triples and a new engine down the road. There’s even been some polishing work to give the bay some extra bling as well.

At this point it’s probably very fair to point out that as things developed and conspired against Iain (through no fault of his own I would add) we (my dad and I) had an upcoming deadline which was our planned trip to Le Mans for the 24 Hours which we had planned to attend in the Z. With the pressure on the car was finished the weekend before we left with Iain working around the clock (quite literally I would add) to make sure the car was finished to his standards in time for us to collect it and take it to France. To top matters off the car had even been fully detailed and waxed so it looked immaculate.

Fortunately for us at all stages Iain worked to our requirements and, as far as was possible, to our schedule, even agreeing to meet us outside of normal business hours to facilitate the collection. When we arrived to collect the car, we were talked though all of the work that had been undertaken, showing us the engine bay, explaining what work had been performed, showing us various worn out items that had been replaced, and explaining any fabrication work that had been undertaken. Following this we were also given a list of advisory items where Iain believed improvements could be made, or potential issues identified that we should be aware of going forward. Finally, knowing we were about to be embarking on a several hundred mile trip, Iain had gone to the effort to make up an emergency repair bag including all sorts of useful items that could potentially keep the car on the road in the event of an issue. I should add that throughout the process we were kept constantly updated with photos showing the current state of the work so that we had copies for our personal records

It’s fair to say that Iain went above and beyond our expectations in all regards and, when it came to the bill, was extremely reasonable considering the time he had invested. I wouldn’t hesitate to recommend him to anyone who needs any work done on their Z, his work was second to none and he’s a true enthusiast.

Nicely tidied up engine ready to rock
IMG_1951 by Mark Woodrow, on Flickr

IMG_1952 by Mark Woodrow, on Flickr
__________________
1971 Datsun 240z - L26 - 918 Orange
Reply With Quote
  #146  
Old 05-07-2017, 10:54 PM
Woody928's Avatar
Woody928 Woody928 is offline
Z Club member
Third gear
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Location: Surrey
Posts: 375
Member 1093
With the car collected and having done about 100 miles including the drive home and several cruises around when it was back we we’re ready to go to Le Mans. Much to my amusement nothing has changed with the amount of heads the car turns, going down to my local to meet a friend the night before departing there were several people ogling over the car while enjoying a pint as I pulled up. Got into conversation with several people before I was allowed to the bar.

D-Day – we decided for better or worse that we didn’t want to purchase EU Breakdown cover given the cost for a five day period and arrogantly thought what could go wrong with a 47 year old Japanese classic sports car driving several hundred miles to France and back with a fresh top end engine rebuild! The usual gear, some spares, basic tools and a tow rope packed and off we went. We got the Ferry from Portsmouth on Wednesday morning going across to Caen in order that we could catch the last free practice and first quali session for the race. With the weather set for scorching heat the Z has no worries over seeing any water.

Deciding we had the time we drove some of my favourite roads down to Le Mans sticking clear of all payage using A and B roads even going through the Forest D’Ecouves Normandie which is always great fun. Having warmed her up the new engine was now pulling like a train leaving me grinning like an idiot as we raced down towards the circuit. Given the cars relative low capabilities/threshold in its very OEM guise its was hilarious fun rolling around going pedal to the metal so to speak. I’d forgotten how much fun it is to drive a slow car fast, albeit it has only served to increase my desire to perform several major upgrades.

Having made it down to the circuit we settled in at Auberge Des Hunaudieres restaurant to catch the end of the GT3 session before the final practice begun. With the car parked in sight from our table we giggled to each other as we saw the amount of passers by who stopped to have a good gawp and admire the car while we enjoyed our meal and the racing. All that done we did something different for the Thursday and left the comfort of the circuit to head South and check out Chateau de Breze which has the largest dry moat in Europe being 18 meters deep and an impressive cave system, enjoying some fantastic roads on the way down it was also easy to spot the Roman influence with dead straight roads for mile on mile (if that floats your boat). On route back we met up with our neighbour who was on his first trip out in his R35 GTR. Its fair to say together they made quite a sight and drew some looks albeit for road presence and performance despite my admirable efforts to drive in a spirited fashion would never come close to Godzilla’s potential.

For a change we also decided to attend the Classic British Welcome which we’d never done before, it’s been going for several years now and draws about 1000 cars of all varieties and ages to a small village local to Le Mans. There was a fantastic turnout with almost anything you could imagine in attendance with the theme this year being Marcos. Thanks to Sean I met up with a French 240Z owner who spoke fantastic English and had a good chat to him about his car and had a good poke around, it was in fantastic condition and right up my street being a practical road legal racecar

Everything was going well and I wish it stayed that way however his is the point where I say ‘but’. While getting back to the car and preparing to head to the circuit for the pit walk I was chatting to another passer-by who asked to have a look at the engine bay. In my typical fashion I went to oblige pulling the bonnet release however a second later I was pulling a very screwed up confused face as I was holding the handle in my hand with about 40cm of cable visible and the engine bay sealed shut. Having realised there was nothing I could do I instantly got several very helpful responses from the usual suspects on Facebook following my pleas for help including the offer of tools and help from a fellow member at a local campsite On reflection though we concluded that there was no real need to access the bay with everything running well that we’d just leave it well alone for the weekend and worry when we got home and had better access and a cold engine to faff with given we had no guaranteed way to fix it even if we opened it up

Several more days of racing went by with visits to other favourite locations such as Hotel de France in Chartre-sur-le-Loir where despite other tasty machinery being parked with the GTR and Z parked together drew a lot of looks and sparked more chats. The car continued to perform very nicely chewing through the miles well into Sunday afternoon as we were returning to Caen for our return crossing following the race. As we made swift progress through the French countryside it was apparent while slowing down to pass through towns that we were smelling a sulphur/bad eggs smell. Quite apparent it wasn’t going anywhere and some scanning over our notoriously ‘reliable’ gauges and it was clear that the Amp gauge was up at maximum +45. Some discussion later and we concluded the voltage regulator had decided it was the end of its days and to give up. Given we were still ticking over nicely and there was little we could do (assuming we were correct) we opted to continue making progress for Caen. The car kept eating up the miles all the way to our obligatory stop in the Wine cave before shooting the last few hundred meters into the Ferry terminal. Having pulled up in the usual queue we made for our usual beer to relax and ponder the machinery and kick tyres with all the other brits waiting alongside.

With the queue starting to move we had to stop chit chatting and jumped into go, a quick turn of the key and nothing….. stone dead nothing… No problem we thought a quick bump start and we’ll be away, no such chance with several of us pushing not even a hint in first or second gear. Pushed to the side several brits seeing our predicament kindly came over offering a battery charger and jump leads. Alas our trivial bonnet being locked was suddenly a big issue! A few discussions with the port authority and having been told we couldn’t be towed with cars having to make their own way to the boat and no tow hook fitted our options were looking thin on the ground….

Several conversations later and that annoying tow rope was suddenly looking very appealing. Having fitted it around the front subframe/cross member we had a big rig turn up with two kind French men from the port. A lot of stress and some giggling later and we had been towed to the back of the ferry, literally being the last car pushed down the ramp onto the boat before departure. Disaster averted the AA were on standby for our arrival back in the UK, the next day having watched every vehicle possible disembark little old us were left in the corner awaiting the ports recovery rig. Not so expected was the jobs worth who arrived refusing to tow us off of the boat on the basis we had no tow hook and he therefore he ‘couldn’t’ tow us. Much bullshit later the car got pushed off to await the AA. Immigration cleared with thanks to Portsmouth port authority we sat and awaited our man in yellow. Agreeing we were buggered we arranged for the car to get towed to Iain to get the car on a high lift to get some decent access.

All arranged we drove not so tastefully on the back of an AA van to West Sussex to be cracked open and analysed before heading back to work as originally planned. By the afternoon our broken bonnet release cable and knackered voltage regulator both confirmed we set about with repair options. Looking to bring the car slightly further into the 21st century we’ve opted to move onto an internally regulated 280zx alternator for hopefully some more reliability. New battery to be sourced and bonnet release cable on route repairs are well underway meaning she should be back on the road in no time.

All ranting aside one day soon I plan to be performing some work by choice which I would like to be do as an ‘improvement’ rather than our usual list of essential areas of attention. Suspension is well and truly on the cards with hopefully some T3 components in the pipeline while other items are sourced including the dreaded conversation of suspension struts. I’m watching a few threads with interest however having chatted with Franky Intrax sounds like a very nice option if I can stretch to the costs.

Other than the minor episode which I now look back and laugh at the car performed faultlessly on its first ever trip to the continent eating up the miles and is hopefully the first of many trips planned over there. I’ll never get bored of saying that I am still blown away by the help I’ve got through the community across our ownership of the car, I still giggle to myself when I see the attention the car gets and love sharing my experience with all of the people I’ve encountered since day one of owning the car. I’m not sure this one will ever get boring…..

I really have now said far too much so I’ll leave you with some pictures to look at from France in the meantime rather than listening to me drone on!

On our way South in France
DSC_0618 by Mark Woodrow, on Flickr

Beautiful war memorial
DSC_0628 by Mark Woodrow, on Flickr

Giving the lady a rest
DSC_0630 by Mark Woodrow, on Flickr

Home for the weekend
DSC_0646 by Mark Woodrow, on Flickr

A quick diversion to Breze for a change
DSC_0650 by Mark Woodrow, on Flickr

DSC_0653 by Mark Woodrow, on Flickr

DSC_0663 by Mark Woodrow, on Flickr

DSC_0668 by Mark Woodrow, on Flickr

The dream team (incase you've never seen the faces behind the project)
IMG_2045 by Mark Woodrow, on Flickr

Lovely French S30 racer
IMG_2090 by Mark Woodrow, on Flickr

IMG_2089 by Mark Woodrow, on Flickr

Evening visit to Hotel de France with our neighbour and Godzilla in tow
FullSizeRender-2 by Mark Woodrow, on Flickr

Our rescue steed in France, helping out a fellow Brit after us...
IMG_2392 by Mark Woodrow, on Flickr

and our trusty steed for the UK
IMG_2398 by Mark Woodrow, on Flickr
__________________
1971 Datsun 240z - L26 - 918 Orange
Reply With Quote
  #147  
Old 05-07-2017, 11:41 PM
Jon_Flynn's Avatar
Jon_Flynn Jon_Flynn is offline
Z Club member
Third gear
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Location: Bradford
Posts: 301
Member 1115
Great write up mate - love following your adventures in the Z. Makes me want to drive mine more :/

Really glad you got the bonnet release sorted, just typical that you had an issue whilst the cable was snapped. It has made me think about going and checking my bonnet release and handbrake cables though...


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Reply With Quote
  #148  
Old 06-07-2017, 08:56 AM
SeanDezart's Avatar
SeanDezart SeanDezart is offline
Z Club member
Sixth gear
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: At home
Posts: 18,382
Member 559
Lovely and thanks also for the engine write up - you've certainly 'done' the French experience ! Breze is fantastic, touring the kichens and wine press inside the caves - you missed out on the wine-tasting in the nearby Chinon and Samaur region - next time and with our club I hope.

Cheers.
__________________
A new Datsun era !

Sean Dézart
(33) 6 14 95 42 17
seanz@wanadoo.fr

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Zstor...6789934?ref=hl

Club Datsun-France www.datsun-france.com

I Love Zs.
Reply With Quote
  #149  
Old 06-07-2017, 09:55 AM
franky franky is online now
Z Club member
Fifth gear
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Sunny southwest
Posts: 2,958
Member 770
Great story. Nice to see it being used so much.

Regarding the suspension, just do what you think's right for you. There's a cheaper option from intrax also. Suspension is the one thing you'll be able to feel at all times.

Ps - great looking car.
Reply With Quote
  #150  
Old 06-07-2017, 10:33 AM
TimW's Avatar
TimW TimW is offline
1978 UK RHD 260z
Second gear
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Location: Milton Keynes
Posts: 144
Member 1116
Great read Woody. I'll be looking for someone to strip down the engine to check it over once the summer months are over, so of particular interest.

These trials are what makes the trips memorable, a sense of adventure.

Stunning photo there Woody. One for my downloads.. Really shows how lovely your car is, as you know I'm a huge fan of the colour from Donnington. Sometimes you see a car that in every detail just works, catches the eye and yours for me is one. I love the look without the spoiler, have been humming and hawing over mine for some time. Your wheels fill the arches perfectly, is it lowered?

DSC_0630 by Mark Woodrow, on Flickr
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 08:27 AM.

The Future Is Bright... The Future Is ZClub!

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Copyright © ZClub.net, All Rights Reserved.