No username? Register here.
Go Back   ZClub.net > General > General discussion
Click here to visit the Z1 Motorsports website

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 28-12-2017, 10:47 AM
RIDDLER RIDDLER is offline
Website member
Fourth gear
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: CHESHIRE
Posts: 1,391
MOT exemption question

As we know, from May cars over 40 years old that have not been substantially altered do not have to undergo an MOT test.
However, owners can voluntarily put their cars through an MOT should they so wish - which seems like a good idea to me.
But the question I canít seem to get answered is this: If you do put your car in voluntarily and it fails, what position does that put you in?
Are you still allowed to drive the car on the road (and renew your free tax) should you choose not to get the work done immediately?
At present, if your car fails, you can only drive it to and from a garage for a repair/re-MOT.
Does the same apply if you have voluntarily taken it in? In other words, is that fail reported to you only or is the DVLA informed?
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 28-12-2017, 10:56 AM
franky franky is online now
Z Club member
Sixth gear
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: usually work
Posts: 3,425
Member 770
Quote:
Originally Posted by RIDDLER View Post
As we know, from May cars over 40 years old that have not been substantially altered do not have to undergo an MOT test.
However, owners can voluntarily put their cars through an MOT should they so wish - which seems like a good idea to me.
But the question I canít seem to get answered is this: If you do put your car in voluntarily and it fails, what position does that put you in?
Are you still allowed to drive the car on the road (and renew your free tax) should you choose not to get the work done immediately?
At present, if your car fails, you can only drive it to and from a garage for a repair/re-MOT.
Does the same apply if you have voluntarily taken it in? In other words, is that fail reported to you only or is the DVLA informed?

Common sense says that if you fail an MOT, its been proven your car isn't road worthy, so any accident/incident will be your own fault so you should be held liable.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 28-12-2017, 12:01 PM
Mr.G's Avatar
Mr.G Mr.G is online now
Z Club member
Sixth gear
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: London
Posts: 3,227
Member 776
Agree with Franky.

Why not say to your friendly mot centre.... I want an mot check over of my car but not an official MOT.

To be fair id rather take the car to a competent mechanic and ask them to check the car over as they would do so with a pre mot check... Modern day MOT test equipment can be quite unnecessarily hard going on old engineering...
__________________
RegardZ,

George aka Mr.G

S.E.K.Z Group / ZClub Member #: 776 / 1973 240Z L28ET(T)

"Once you get inside a Z, a Z will get inside of you", Mike "8.46sec" Feeney
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 28-12-2017, 01:50 PM
Rob Gaskin's Avatar
Rob Gaskin Rob Gaskin is online now
Membership Secretary
Sixth gear
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Hinckley
Posts: 10,735
Member 214
Quote:
Originally Posted by RIDDLER View Post
As we know, from May cars over 40 years old that have not been substantially altered do not have to undergo an MOT test.
However, owners can voluntarily put their cars through an MOT should they so wish - which seems like a good idea to me.
But the question I canít seem to get answered is this: If you do put your car in voluntarily and it fails, what position does that put you in?
Are you still allowed to drive the car on the road (and renew your free tax) should you choose not to get the work done immediately?
At present, if your car fails, you can only drive it to and from a garage for a repair/re-MOT.
Does the same apply if you have voluntarily taken it in? In other words, is that fail reported to you only or is the DVLA informed?
Rob I've already thought about that on Mrfs DfT Thread.

Another scenario:

You decide to take your car for an MoT test even though you could declare it exempt.

It fails on a few minor things like wiper function, indicator speed, lighting switch unreliable, rear wheel-bearing play. All things you could live with but which would cost money too get them sorted to pass the MoT.

What do you do now? Is your car now declared unfit for the road and you can't use it whereas you could have done if you had taken the exemption route?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr.G View Post
.......... Modern day MOT test equipment can be quite unnecessarily hard going on old engineering...
Please explain with examples.
__________________
240Z '71 Built and Modified by DJR
260Z Super Samuri
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 28-12-2017, 02:08 PM
franky franky is online now
Z Club member
Sixth gear
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: usually work
Posts: 3,425
Member 770
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rob Gaskin View Post
Rob I've already thought about that on Mrfs DfT Thread.

Another scenario:

You decide to take your car for an MoT test even though you could declare it exempt.

It fails on a few minor things like wiper function, indicator speed, lighting switch unreliable, rear wheel-bearing play. All things you could live with but which would cost money too get them sorted to pass the MoT.

What do you do now? Is your car now declared unfit for the road and you can't use it whereas you could have done if you had taken the exemption route?




Please explain with examples.
As above Rob, you've proven beyond reason that your car isn't road worthy so anything that happens that they can attribute to your car will end up with you being held liable.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 28-12-2017, 02:29 PM
Mr.G's Avatar
Mr.G Mr.G is online now
Z Club member
Sixth gear
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: London
Posts: 3,227
Member 776
Rob, sorry I don't have any empirical examples as such but just going on what my MOT tester said to me last year when i took one of my classics for an MOT.. He said that the new equipment for instance have hydraulic shake down plates fitted into the ramps for determining wheel bearing play, he felt this was too violent for older cars and thought that the traditional way of grabbing the wheel with both hands a better option for older vehicles.

Also, I didn't fancy putting my car through the rollers to check the brakes, as it's a semi auto and a 71 vintage, luckily he had a traditional brake testing meter, which you place in the footwell and break whilst driving normally.
__________________
RegardZ,

George aka Mr.G

S.E.K.Z Group / ZClub Member #: 776 / 1973 240Z L28ET(T)

"Once you get inside a Z, a Z will get inside of you", Mike "8.46sec" Feeney
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 28-12-2017, 02:38 PM
franky franky is online now
Z Club member
Sixth gear
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: usually work
Posts: 3,425
Member 770
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr.G View Post
Rob, sorry I don't have any empirical examples as such but just going on what my MOT tester said to me last year when i took one of my classics for an MOT.. He said that the new equipment for instance have hydraulic shake down plates fitted into the ramps for determining wheel bearing play, he felt this was too violent for older cars and thought that the traditional way of grabbing the wheel with both hands a better option for older vehicles.

Also, I didn't fancy putting my car through the rollers to check the brakes, as it's a semi auto and a 71 vintage, luckily he had a traditional brake testing meter, which you place in the footwell and break whilst driving normally.
How are you getting on with your French lady? bet its a great cruiser.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 28-12-2017, 02:51 PM
Mr.G's Avatar
Mr.G Mr.G is online now
Z Club member
Sixth gear
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: London
Posts: 3,227
Member 776
Quote:
Originally Posted by franky View Post
How are you getting on with your French lady? bet its a great cruiser.
Very well thanks Franky, best way to describe it is floating on a cloud....very effortless driving, handles surprisingly well, big grin and can't wait for the spring to get her out again. Hope your Z is coming on nicely, I recall some very trick bits going on it
__________________
RegardZ,

George aka Mr.G

S.E.K.Z Group / ZClub Member #: 776 / 1973 240Z L28ET(T)

"Once you get inside a Z, a Z will get inside of you", Mike "8.46sec" Feeney
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 28-12-2017, 02:52 PM
Rob Gaskin's Avatar
Rob Gaskin Rob Gaskin is online now
Membership Secretary
Sixth gear
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Hinckley
Posts: 10,735
Member 214
Quote:
Originally Posted by franky View Post
As above Rob, you've proven beyond reason that your car isn't road worthy so anything that happens that they can attribute to your car will end up with you being held liable.
So the temptation is going to be to declare exemption. It will also save you £40, 2 hrs of your time and someone else getting their grubby hands on your classic. Yes ideally take it, have it pass or fail get it sorted and peace of mind. Plus it would be easier to sell with an MoT Cert.

However would you put yourself through the driving test again - we should really? What would you do if you failed and were not allowed to drive until you could pass.

Human Nature will mean that there will be more un-roadworthy cars on the road. Progress?
__________________
240Z '71 Built and Modified by DJR
260Z Super Samuri
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 28-12-2017, 03:00 PM
Rob Gaskin's Avatar
Rob Gaskin Rob Gaskin is online now
Membership Secretary
Sixth gear
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Hinckley
Posts: 10,735
Member 214
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr.G View Post
Rob, sorry I don't have any empirical examples as such but just going on what my MOT tester said to me last year when i took one of my classics for an MOT.. He said that the new equipment for instance have hydraulic shake down plates fitted into the ramps for determining wheel bearing play, he felt this was too violent for older cars and thought that the traditional way of grabbing the wheel with both hands a better option for older vehicles.

Also, I didn't fancy putting my car through the rollers to check the brakes, as it's a semi auto and a 71 vintage, luckily he had a traditional brake testing meter, which you place in the footwell and break whilst driving normally.
I like those 'shake plates' for finding suspension issues - I wish I had access to one. It's really hard to find 'play' and causes of knocking sometimes. Brake testing - that footwell meter won't show up uneven brake efficiency will it?

I still struggle to find what is not relevant with old cars apart from emissions. Headlight alignment tool is another good bit of kit.
__________________
240Z '71 Built and Modified by DJR
260Z Super Samuri
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 28-12-2017, 08:10 PM
STEVE BURNS's Avatar
STEVE BURNS STEVE BURNS is online now
I loved my 280ZX
Sixth gear
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Greenford, Middlesex
Posts: 10,416
Member 6
Dont think members on here will like my thoughts on this
But what a stupid bit of legislation

I know that the test that used to go with the old MOT only told of what the car was like on the day of the test but at least it went through saying it was safe on the day and not a life threatening danger to others on the road
So now a car that could be a death trap could be knowingly driven on the road until it has had major accident
__________________
Z Club # 6,
300zx-club.com #16,
300zx.co.uk #96,
350ZUK #151,
350Z-UK #79,
IZCC #2872
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 28-12-2017, 08:44 PM
JonB's Avatar
JonB JonB is offline
Z Club member
First gear
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: London
Posts: 15
Member 1034
I think I will trust my mechanic (and my own thoughts) as to what is safe?!
We do wonderfully well with no road tax, and cheap classic car insurance, so why not be responsible and drive a safe car?
My other car is a '73 CitroŽn SM, and it is a nightmare when it comes to the MOT- mainly with the self-levelling headlights which move with the steering, and (technically illegal in the UK?) orange reversing lights and a speedo which only reads in kph... for that, I will be grateful for the change, but will always ensure that both he and I are happy with the cars...
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 28-12-2017, 08:53 PM
STEVE BURNS's Avatar
STEVE BURNS STEVE BURNS is online now
I loved my 280ZX
Sixth gear
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Greenford, Middlesex
Posts: 10,416
Member 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by JonB View Post
I think I will trust my mechanic (and my own thoughts) as to what is safe?!
We do wonderfully well with no road tax, and cheap classic car insurance, so why not be responsible and drive a safe car?
The majority probably will be responsible but there will be quite a few who will not be and will be driving unroadworthy car and in my view that number will increase the longer this is in place
__________________
Z Club # 6,
300zx-club.com #16,
300zx.co.uk #96,
350ZUK #151,
350Z-UK #79,
IZCC #2872
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 28-12-2017, 09:17 PM
JonB's Avatar
JonB JonB is offline
Z Club member
First gear
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: London
Posts: 15
Member 1034
Mmmm... you may well be right!
Maybe I have too much trust in assuming that anyone who appreciates the values of a 40+ year old car is going to be sensible?
I will still do the MOT anyway since it will help with my insurance- no worries with my 'Z, but I will have to take the SM to a dedicated place that knows about them!
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 28-12-2017, 09:53 PM
Woody928's Avatar
Woody928 Woody928 is offline
Z Club member
Third gear
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Location: Surrey
Posts: 472
Member 1093
Apologies for swaying slightly away from the OP's question but I personally don't think this is the big issue that a lot of people are making it out to be. This change is only following on from what is already in place for cars built for 1960 which are already MOT exempt. How many of those cars do you ever hear about having fatal accidents due to poor maintenance? (I've personally not heard of any).

Those who maintain their cars will continue to do so and those that are more relaxed will likely notice any changes as they drive the car and/or take it in for work where the car usually gets a once over anyway. It's not as if any of these cars are high mileage daily vehicles anyway.

The change is coming regardless so just accept it and move on....
__________________
1971 Datsun 240z - L26 - 918 Orange
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 09:07 PM.

The Future Is Bright... The Future Is ZClub!

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Copyright © ZClub.net, All Rights Reserved.